top of page
cannabis-g2a0015c3b_1920.jpg

About Medical Cannabis in Virginia 

Medical marijuana is legal in the state of Virginia. 

You must be a legal resident of Virginia and able to provide proof of residency to apply for a Virginia medical cannabis card. 

How Can Medical Cannabis Help?

Reduces inflammation

Kills cancer cells and slows tumor growth

Stimulates appetite 

Weight gain aid in cancer and HIV

Relieves pain

Reduces anxiety

Helps relax muscles

Image by Mohamed Nohassi

Conditions Medical Cannabis May Help

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

Anxiety

Arnold-Chiari malformation

Arthritis

Autism

Alzheimer's Disease 

Cachexia and wasting syndrome

Cancer

Causalgia

Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

Chronic pain

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

Crohn's Disease

Depression

Dystonia

Eating Disorders

Epilepsy and other seizure disorders

Fibrous dysplasia

Glaucoma

Hepatitis C

HIV

Huntington's Disease

Hydrocephalus 

Hydromyelia

​Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Insomnia

Interstitial cystitis

Lupus

Migraines

Multiple Sclerosis 

Muscle Spasms

Muscular Dystrophy

Myasthenia gravis

Myoclonus

Nausea and vomiting 

Nail-patella syndrome

Neurofibromatosis

Parkinson's Disease

Peripheral Neuropathy

Post-concussion syndrome

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

PMS/PMDD

Rheumatoid arthritis

Schizophrenia

Sickle Cell Anemia

Sjogren's syndome

Spinal cord disease

Spinal cord injury 

Substance Abuse Disorders

Tarlov cysts

Terminal illness for comfort purposes

Traumatic brain injury (TBI)

Tourette's Syndrome 

Image by Faye Cornish

Risks Associated with Medical Cannabis

One possible risk with cannabis use is addiction. 

If you do become dependent on cannabis, you may have withdrawal symptoms if you stop using the drug. 

Withdrawal symptoms may include:

-irritability

-insomnia

-mood difficulties

-decreased appetite

-physical discomfort

-nausea

-restlessness

Image by Jeremy Bishop

Forms of Medical Cannabis

  • Inhalation: vaping and smoking

  • Oral ingestion: oils, tinctures, capsules, and edibles

  • Topical: salves, balms, and patches

  • Suppositories: rectal or vaginal suppositories 

bottom of page